Sharpening Your Knife

Refurbishing / Sharpening

If you are not comfortable with sharpening your knife yourself you can send it to us at our manufacturing facility for refurbishing. The price is $10.00/knife + $10.00* shipping (6.25% tax added for TX residence). Refurbishing consists of the following four steps:

  1. Bead blasting the surface of the knife to remove discoloration or rust spots
  2. Peening the blade to a satin finish that is easier to clean and scratch resistant
  3. Re-etching the blade
  4. Sharpen the blade to factory specifications

Please go to our Returns page, complete the Customer Return Form and follow the instructions for returning your knife. 

 

*limit of 5 knives

Tips for Sharpening Your Knife

For Fixed Blade Knives:  Prior to sharpening with hand steel, run a magic marker along edge.  If you sharpen such that the marker line is evenly worn, you will maintain the blade angle.

For the Muskrat:  When sharpening by hand we recommend using a Gatco sharpening kit. Set your sharpener up on an 18-20 degree angle. Start from the handle end and drag towards the center of the 1 inch rounded nose of the Muskrat blade. When you have an acceptable edge along the cutting portion of the blade blend the area on the center of the 1 inch blade that you drug towards to finish the sharpen.

For the Gut Hooks:  Use a conical sharpener slightly smaller than gut hook opening.

For the Ulu's:  You cannot use one of the sharpening systems to set the angle the handle will not let you to set the blade up. Secure the blade on a hard flat surface such as a desk or table. Extend the edge of the ulu out past the edge of the table while keeping the handle flat and depressed firmly. Now take a sharpener such as our diamond coated steel or a whetstone and stroke the entire length of the blade with the steel or stone keeping the angle consistent with what was ground in at our factory. It may be a little awkward at first, but you will improve with practice. If you have ever sharpened a double-bitted axe it is a similar movement. The blade stays put and the stone or steel moves down the length of sharpened edge.